Significant
ROI with Propane

YOUR FLEET

Available Engines:
Dedicated (Repower)
Bi-Fuel

Qualifying Vehicles:
Light- and medium-duty propane vehicles Heavy-duty vehicles e.g. step van, school buses
Learn More

LOW MAINTENANCE COSTS

Propane burns clean in the combustion chamber with virtually no residue and minimal carbon deposits
Learn More

EASY REFUELING

There is a network of private and public fueling stations across Michigan.

Onsite fueling stations are available as well.
Learn More

CLEAN BURNING

Fleets of all types can reduce their emissions by switching to propane.
Learn More

purchase new or convert?

Dedicated Engine

Propane fueled vehicles are available from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and can be ordered from the OEMs direct.

e.g. light-duty propane vehicles

Bi-Fuel Engine

Vehicles can be converted by a qualified system retrofitter (QSR) to light, medium or heavy-duty vehicles

e.g. F-150, F-250, E-vans, fleets

Plus, converting your vehicle only take one day!

Infrastructure options:

400 miles per tank fill with propane

Onsite Standard Private station

  • Best for a fleet of less than 5o 
  • Onsite 1,000 – 3,000-gallon tank

Option 1: Propane Supplier Owns Infrastructure

The fleet is responsible for site preparation: crash protection and electrical.

Cost for Fleet: $1,500-$15,000 (site preparation)

Option 2: Fleet Owns Infrastructure

The fleet will need to account for purchasing the propane tank, pump, motor, and dispenser.

Cost for Fleet: $20,000-$60,000 (infrastructure) + $1,500-$15,000 (site preparation)

Onsite Standard Private station

  • Best for 50+ vehicles
  • Larger gallon tank, canopy & multiple dispensers

Option 1: Propane Supplier Owns Infrastructure

The fleet is responsible for site preparation: crash protection and electrical for a two-dispenser setup.

Cost for Fleet: $5,000-$75,000 (site preparation)

Option 2: Fleet Owns Infrastructure

The fleet is responsible for site preparation: crash protection and electrical for a two-dispenser setup.

Cost for Fleet: $60,000-$225,000 (infrastructure) + $5,000-$75,000 (site preparation)

Onsite Standard Private station

Fleets with limited space, or fleets needing more fueling locations along their routes can take advantage of this option with no infrastructure investment. Network refueling stations are accessible 24/7 through a card lock system.

If a network is not currently available in your area, a propane supplier may create one for your fleet, if it’s large enough. Alternatively, multiple fleets can team up to provide adequate load for requesting a refueling network.

Propane fuel emissions comparisons

Propane has been considered an Alternative Fuel by the EPA since 1992!

MEDIUM-DUTY TRUCKS

Comparisons:
NOx: 4% less vs. diesel
GHG: 12% less vs. diesel

LIGHT-DUTY TRUCKS

Comparisons:
SOx: 37% less vs. gasoline
NOx: 36% less vs. diesel 
            5% less vs. gasoline
GHG: 12% less vs. gasoline

SCHOOL BUSES

Comparisons:
NOx: 96% less vs. clean diesel buses

Why schools love propane

Propane fueled buses provide benefits throughout your district!

UNCOMPROMISED SAFETY

Compared with diesel engines, propane autogas engines are noticeably quieter when operating.

  • Bus drivers are responsible for students’ safety during transportation. A quieter bus allows bus drivers to perform their jobs in a much less chaotic environment.
  • Easier to monitor students in the rear of the bus and take quick action in an emergency.
  • Easier to concentrate on the road ahead and provide a safe ride to and from school.

NO MORE BLACK SMOKE

Schools can switch to propane autogas buses to protect students from dangerous diesel exhaust.

  • The shorter height of younger students puts them face-to-face with a black cloud of diesel smoke every school day.
  • Children in wheelchairs are especially vulnerable to inhaling diesel exhaust.
  • Propane autogas buses do not aggravate the symptoms of students with asthma or otherbreathing-related issues.

SAVINGS FOR WHAT COUNTS

When a school district switches to propane autogas technology, they’re in a better position to afford what students need most.

  • More teachers reduce class sizes for more individualized student attention.

  • Everyday classroom supplies — pencils, markers, notebooks — which teachers may otherwise need to buy out-of-pocket.

  • Savings can be used to fund special education programs and hire specialist educators.

  • Funding for more robust fine arts and athletic programs that increase students’ confidence and provide a well-rounded education.